Any

any determiner, pronoun, adverb BrE [ˈeni]
NAmE [ˈeni]
determiner
1. used with uncountable or plural nouns in negative sentences and questions, after if or whether, and after some verbs such as prevent, ban, forbid, etc. to refer to an amount or a number of sth, however large or small
I didn't eat any meat.
Are there any stamps?
I've got hardly any money.
You can't go out without any shoes.
He forbids any talking in class.
She asked if we had any questions.  In positive sentences some is usually used instead of any
I've got some paper if you want it. It is also used in questions that expect a positive answer
Would you like some milk in your tea?
2. used with singular countable nouns to refer to one of a number of things or people, when it does not matter which one
Take any book you like.
Any colour will do.
Any teacher will tell you that students learn at different rates.
see also in any case at case n., in any event at event, at any rate at rate n.
3. not just ~ sb/sth used to show that sb/sth is special
It isn't just any day— it's my birthday!
Word Origin:
Old English ǣnig (from one + -y), of Germanic origin; related to Dutch eenig and German einig.
Idiom: somebody isn't having any
pronoun
1. used in negative sentences and in questions and after if or whether to refer to an amount or a number, however large or small
We need some more paint; there isn't any left.
I need some stamps. Are there any in your bag?
Please let me know how many people are coming, if any.
She spent hardly any of the money.
He returned home without any of the others.  In positive sentences some is usually used instead of any. It is also used in questions that expect a positive reply
I've got plenty of paper— would you like some?
2. one or more of a number of people or things, especially when it does not matter which
I'll take any you don't want.
‘Which colour do you want?’ ‘Any of them will do.’
Word Origin:
Old English ǣnig (from one + -y), of Germanic origin; related to Dutch eenig and German einig.
adverb
1. used to emphasize an adjective or adverb in negative sentences or questions, meaning ‘at all’
He wasn't any good at French.
I can't run any faster.
Is your father feeling any better?
I don't want any more.
If you don't tell them, nobody will be any the wiser (= they will not find out about it).
2. (NAmE, informal) used at the end of a negative sentence to mean ‘at all’
That won't hurt you any.
Word Origin:
[any] Old English ǣnig (from one + -y), of Germanic origin; related to Dutch eenig and German einig.

Webster's 1913 Dictionary:
a. & pron.1.One indifferently, out of an indefinite number; one indefinitely, whosoever or whatsoever it may be.
No man knoweth the Son, but the Father; neither knoweth any man the Father, save the Son.
2.Some, of whatever kind, quantity, or number; as, are there any witnesses present? are there any other houses like it?
If any of you lack wisdom, let him ask of God, . . . and it shall be given him.
That if he found any of this way, whether they were men or women, he might bring them bound unto Jerusalem.
At any rate
whatever may be the state of affairs; anyhow.
adv.1.To any extent; in any degree; at all.
You are not to go loose any longer.
Before you go any farther.

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