Damp

damp [damp damps damped damping damper dampest] adjective, noun, verb BrE [dæmp]
NAmE [dæmp]
adjective (damp·er, damp·est)
slightly wet, often in a way that is unpleasant
The cottage was cold and damp.
It feels damp in here.
damp clothes
Wipe the surface with a damp cloth.
Word Origin:
Middle English (in the noun sense ‘noxious inhalation’): of West Germanic origin; related to a Middle Low German word meaning vapour, steam, smoke.
Thesaurus:
damp adj. (sometimes disapproving)
The cottage was cold and damp.
wet|often approving moist|usually disapproving soggy
damp/wet/moist with sth
damp/wet/moist/soggy ground
damp/wet/moist earth/soil
Synonyms:
wet
moist damp soaked drenched saturated
These words all describe things covered with or full of liquid, especially water.
wet • covered with or full of liquid, especially water: The car had skidded on the wet road. You'll get wet (= in the rain) if you go out now.
moist • slightly wet, often in a way that is pleasant or useful: a lovely rich moist cake
damp • slightly wet, often in a way that is unpleasant: The cottage was cold and damp.
soaked • (rather informal) very wet: You're soaked through! (= completely wet)
drenched • very wet: We were caught in the storm and came home drenched to the skin.
soaked or drenched?
Both of these words can be used with with or in: soaked/drenched with/in sweat/blood. Soaked but not usually drenched can also be used before a noun: their soaked clothes ◇ their drenched clothes
saturated • very wet: The ground is completely saturated: it would be pointless to plant anything.
wet/moist/damp/soaked/drenched/saturated with sth
soaked/drenched in sth
sb's coat/shirt/shoes/clothes/hair is/are wet/damp/soaked/drenched
wet/moist/damp/saturated ground/earth
to get wet/moist/damp/soaked/drenched/saturated
Example Bank:
Our clothes had got a bit damp.
The rain had made the walls damp.
The room smelled damp.
We took off our damp clothes.
Idiom: damp squib
Derived Word: damply
Derived: damp down something damp something down
noun uncountable (BrE)
the state of being damp; areas on a wall, etc. that are damp
The old house smells of damp.
Those marks above the window look like damp to me.
Word Origin:
Middle English (in the noun sense ‘noxious inhalation’): of West Germanic origin; related to a Middle Low German word meaning vapour, steam, smoke.
Example Bank:
The house had got woodworm and rising damp.
The surveyor found damp in the kitchen.
One wall of my house is affected by rising damp.
The house smells of damp.
verb ~ sth
= dampen
She damped a towel and wrapped it round his leg.
Verb forms:
Word Origin:
Middle English (in the noun sense ‘noxious inhalation’): of West Germanic origin; related to a Middle Low German word meaning vapour, steam, smoke.

WordNet Dictionary:
I
noun
a slight wetness
Syn: dampness, moistness
II
verb
1. deaden (a sound or noise), especially by wrapping
Syn: muffle, mute, dull, dampen, tone down
2. restrain or discourage
- the sudden bad news damped the joyous atmosphere
- clothes damp with perspiration
- a moist breeze
- eyes moist with tears
Syn: dampish, moist
- Stifle your curiosity
Syn: stifle
Ant: stimulate (for: stifle)
2. make moist
- The dew moistened the meadows
Syn: moisten, wash
3. deaden (a sound or noise), especially by wrapping
Syn: muffle, mute, dull, damp, tone down
4. reduce the amplitude (of oscillations or waves)
5. make vague or obscure or make (an image) less visible
- muffle the message
Syn: deaden, damp
6. check; keep in check (a fire)
7. lessen in force or effect
- soften a shock
- break a fall
Syn: damp, soften, weaken, break

Webster's 1913 Dictionary:
n.1.Moisture; humidity; fog; fogginess; vapor.
Night . . . with black air
Accompanied, with damps and dreadful gloom.
2.Dejection; depression; cloud of the mind.
Even now, while thus I stand blest in thy presence,
A secret damp of grief comes o'er my soul.
It must have thrown a damp over your autumn excursion.
3.(Mining) A gaseous product, formed in coal mines, old wells, pints, etc.
Choke damp
a damp consisting principally of carbonic acid gas; - so called from its extinguishing flame and animal life. See Carbonic acid, under Carbonic.
Damp sheet
a curtain in a mine gallery to direct air currents and prevent accumulation of gas.
Fire damp
a damp consisting chiefly of light carbureted hydrogen; - so called from its tendence to explode when mixed with atmospheric air and brought into contact with flame.
a.1.Being in a state between dry and wet; moderately wet; moist; humid.
O'erspread with a damp sweat and holy fear.
2.Dejected; depressed; sunk.
All these and more came flocking, but with looks
Downcast and damp.
v. i.1.To render damp; to moisten; to make humid, or moderately wet; to dampen; as, to damp cloth.
[imp. & p. p. Damped ; p. pr. & vb. n. Damping.]
2.To put out, as fire; to depress or deject; to deaden; to cloud; to check or restrain, as action or vigor; to make dull; to weaken; to discourage.
Usury dulls and damps all industries, improvements, and new inventions, wherein money would be stirring if it were not for this slug.
How many a day has been damped and darkened by an angry word!
The failure of his enterprise damped the spirit of the soldiers.

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