Money

money [money moneys monies] BrE [ˈmʌni]
NAmE [ˈmʌni]
noun
1. uncountable what you earn by working or selling things, and use to buy things
to borrow/save/spend/earn money
How much money is there in my account?
The money is much better in my new job.
If the item is not satisfactory, you will get your money back.
We'll need to raise more money (= collect or borrow it) next year.
Can you lend me some money until tomorrow?
Be careful with that — it cost a lot of money.
2. uncountable coins or paper notes
I counted the money carefully.
Where can I change my money into dollars?
see also funny money, paper money, ready money
3. uncountable a person's wealth including their property
He lost all his money.
The family made their money in the 18th century.
4. moneys or monies plural (law or old use) sums of money
a statement of all monies paid into your account  You will find other compounds ending in money at their place in the alphabet.
more at the best that money can buy at best n., careful with money at careful, coining money at coin v., see the colour of sb's money at colour n., easy money at easy adj., a fool and his money are soon parted at fool n., it/money doesn't grow on trees at grow, a licence to print money at licence n., not for love or/nor money at love n., marry money at marry, expense, money, etc. is no object at object, pay good money for sthyou pays your money and you takes your choice at pay v., pots of money at pot n., be rolling in money/it at roll v., give sb a (good) run for their money at run n., time is money at time n.
Idioms: for my money get your money's worth good money have money to burn in the money made of money make money make money hand over fist money for jam rope money is no object money talks on the money put money into something put your money on somebody put your money where your mouth is throw good money after bad throw money at something throw your money about
Word Origin:
Middle English: from Old French moneie, from Latin moneta ‘mint, money’, originally a title of the goddess Juno, in whose temple in Rome money was minted.
Culture:
money
The US dollar is made up of 100 cents. The Department of the Treasury prints bills (= paper money) in various denominations (= values): $1, $2, $5, $10, $20, $50 and $100. US bills are all the same size, whatever their value, and measure about 2×6 inches/6.5×15.5 centimetres. All are green and are sometimes called greenbacks. On the front, each has a picture of a famous American. The dollar bill, for instance, shows George Washington, the first US president. An informal name for dollars is bucks, because in the early period of US history people traded the skins of bucks (= deer) and prices would sometimes be given as a number of buckskins. Buck refers to the dollar itself, and not to the bill. So although you can say ‘He earns 500 bucks a week’, you have to say ‘If I give you four quarters could you give me a dollar bill?’
The Treasury also makes US coins: pennies which are worth.01 of a dollar, nickels (.05), dimes (.10) and quarters (.25). There are also half dollars (.50) and silver dollars but these are not often seen. Pennies have a dark brown colour; all the other coins have a silver appearance.
When you write an amount in figures the dollar sign ($) goes to the left of the amount and a decimal point (.) is placed between the dollars and the cents (= hundredths of a dollar). If the amount is less than one dollar, the cent sign (¢) is put after the numbers. So you write $5, $5.62 and 62¢.
Britain’s currency is the pound sterling, written as £ before a figure. A pound consists of 100 pence, written as p with figures. Pound coins are round and gold-coloured. They have the Queen’s head on one side and one of four designs, English, Scottish, Welsh or Northern Irish, on the other. The £2 coin is silver-coloured with a gold edge. Coins of lower value are the silver-coloured 50p, 20p, 10p and 5p pieces, and the copper-coloured 2p and 1p pieces. All are round, except for the 50p and 20p pieces which have seven curved sides. Coins are made at the Royal Mint. Paper notes (not bills), which have the Queen’s head on one side and a famous person, e.g. Charles Dickens, on the other, are worth £5, £10, £20 or £50.
A pound is informally called a quid, a £5 note is a fiver, a £10 note is a tenner. Scottish banknotes have their own designs. They can be used anywhere in Britain, though shops can legally refuse to accept them. To prevent people forging (= making their own) paper money, designs are complicated and difficult to copy. To check that a note is genuine, a shop assistant may hold it up to the light to see if it has a narrow silver thread running through it.
The decimal system now in use in Britain replaced the old pounds, shilling and pence, or LSD system in 1971. Formerly British money was in pounds, shillings and pence. There were 12 pence or pennies in a shilling, and 20 shillings in a pound. The old coins included the farthing (= a quarter of a penny) and the half-crown (= two shillings and sixpence). There were notes for 10 shillings, £1 and £5.
Gold guinea coins were used in the 18th century and were worth 21 shillings. Until 1971 prices were often set in guineas instead of pounds for luxury items, such as antiques and jewellery, for the fees of doctors, lawyers, etc, and at auctions, though the guinea coin had long since gone out of circulation. Some racehorses are still auctioned in guineas.
On 1 January 1999 the euro system was introduced in 11 countries of the European Union. Britain chose not to be part of this first group and no date was fixed for Britain to start using the euro. However, many British businesses have euro bank accounts so as to be able to pay for goods and be paid in euros and many shops in Britain accept payment in euros.
Thesaurus:
money noun
1. U
The hospital is raising money for a new kidney machine.
funds • • finance • • capital • • means|informal cash
government/public money/funds/finance/capital/cash
have/lack the money/funds/finance/capital/means/cash (to do sth)
be short of money/funds/capital/cash
2. U
I counted the money carefully.
cash • • change
draw out/get out/take out/withdraw money/cash
ready money/cash (= money that you have available to spend immediately)
Money or cash? If it is important to contrast money in the form of coins and notes with money in other forms, use cash:
Payments can be made by cheque or in cash.
 ✗ Payments can be made by cheque or in money.
3. U
He lost all his money on the stock market in 2008.
wealth • • fortune|often approving prosperity|sometimes disapproving affluence|literary riches
have/possess/accumulate/acquire/inherit money/wealth/a fortune/riches
bring money/wealth/prosperity/affluence/riches
make money/a fortune (on/out of sth)
Collocations:
Finance
Income
earn money/cash/(informal) a fortune
make money/a fortune/(informal) a killing on the stock market
acquire/inherit/amass wealth/a fortune
build up funds/savings
get/receive/leave (sb) an inheritance/a legacy
live on a low wage/a fixed income/a pension
get/receive/draw/collect a pension
depend/be dependent on (BrE) benefits/(NAmE) welfare/social security
Expenditure
spend money/your savings/(informal) a fortune on…
invest/put your savings in…
throw away/waste/ (informal) shell out money on…
lose your money/inheritance/pension
use up/ (informal) wipe out all your savings
pay (in) cash
use/pay by a credit/debit card
pay by/make out a/write sb a/accept a (BrE) cheque/(US) check
change/exchange money/currency (BrE) traveller's cheques/(US) traveler's checks
give/pay/leave (sb) a deposit
Banks
have/hold/open/close/freeze a bank account/an account
credit/debit/pay sth into/take money out of your account
deposit money/funds in your account
withdraw money/cash/£30 from an ATM, etc.
(formal) make a deposit/withdrawal
find/go to/use (especially NAmE) an ATM/(BrE) a cash machine/dispenser
be in credit/in debit/in the black/in the red/overdrawn
Personal finance
manage/handle/plan/run/ (especially BrE) sort out your finances
plan/manage/work out/stick to a budget
offer/extend credit (to sb)
arrange/take out a loan/an overdraft
pay back/repay money/a loan/a debt
pay for sth in (especially BrE) instalments/(NAmE usually) installments
Financial difficulties
get into debt/financial difficulties
be short of/ (informal) be strapped for cash
run out of/owe money
face/get/ (informal) be landed with a bill for £…
can't afford the cost of…/payments/rent
fall behind with/ (especially NAmE) fall behind on the mortgage/repayments/rent
incur/run up/accumulate debts
tackle/reduce/settle your debts
Synonyms:
money
cash change
These are all words for money in the form of coins or paper notes.
money • money in the form of coins or paper notes: I counted the money carefully. Where can I change my money into dollars? paper money (= money that is made of paper, not coins)
cash • money in the form of coins or paper notes: How much cash do you have on you? Payments can be made by cheque or in cash .
money or cash?
If it is important to contrast money in the form of coins and notes and money in other forms, use cash: How much money/cash do you have on you? ◇ Payments can be made by cheque or in money. ◇ Customers are offered a discount if they pay money.
change • the money that you get back when you have paid for sth giving more money than the amount it costs; coins rather than paper money: The ticket machine doesn't give change. I don't have any small change (= coins of low value) .
to draw out/get out/take out/withdraw money/cash
ready money/cash (= money that you have available to spend immediately)
Example Bank:
All his money went on women.
All their money was tied up in long-term investments.
All these improvements will cost money.
Did your parents give you pocket money when you were little?
Government officials were siphoning off money for personal gain.
Half the money raised was donated to charity.
He contributed $180 000 in soft money= unregulated political donationsto the party committee.
He felt sorry for her and took some money off her bill.
He hoped the plan would bring in quite a bit of money.
He made a fortune dealing on the money markets.
He managed to persuade his friend to put up the money for the venture.
He sank most of his money into his struggling business.
He spent their rent money on beer.
He squandered his money on gambling and drink.
He started stealing as a way of making easy money.
He stopped at the betting shop to put money on a horse.
He thinks he can make friends by throwing his money around.
He was charged with laundering money.
He'll do anything for money!
He's going to leave. I'd bet money on it.
His prediction was right on the money.
How much money did he earn last year?
I don't have any money left.
I don't know how much spending money to take on holiday.
I don't know where all the money goes!
I don't think they'll accept French money on the plane.
I need to pay this money in today.
I pay my money into the bank as soon as I get paid.
I spent all the money on clothes.
I'll have to get some more money from somewhere.
I'll pay the money back next week, I promise.
Investors were pouring money into Internet start-ups.
Is this a good way to spend taxpayers' money?
Money for the extension to the gallery came from the sale of old exhibits.
Most of the money went to pay for food.
Most of the money went to pay for the food and drink.
She gave him $5 lunch money.
She had two children to support and no money coming in.
She lost a lot of money at the casino.
She stashed the money away in the bank.
Some of this money was funneled to secret CIA programs.
Some people were in the street collecting money for charity.
That painting is worth a lot of money.
The Senate recognized the need to put more money in the pockets of dairy farmers.
The boat trip lasts three hours, so you certainly get your money's worth.
The bookmaker was quite happy to take his money.
The collection box was full of coins and paper money.
The company paid hush money to the victims to keep them quiet.
The friends pooled their money to buy tickets.
The hotel gives value for money.
The manager was unwilling to refund my money.
The money was transferred into an offshore bank account.
The new airport terminal was built with oil money.
The quality of public health care depends on the amount of money allocated to it.
The smart money is on Brazil to win.
The solution to inflation lies in the control of the money supply.
The stallholders bank their money at the end of the day.
The stores were very happy to take his money.
There is big money in golf for the top players.
These cars cost a lot of money.
They demanded $1 million in ransom money.
They owe lots of people money.
They sensibly invested their prize money rather than spending it.
They tend to throw money at problems without trying to work out the best solution.
This money has been earmarked for public projects.
We changed our money into dollars at the airport.
We ran out of money and had to come home early.
We're trying to set some money aside for a new car.
Whenever I have a little extra money, I buy clothes.
Where's the money for the milk?
You could consider hiring a professional money manager.
You might get some money off the price if it's an old model.
an old miser who hoarded his money
the best car that money can buy
the large sums of money we handle in this store
He hoped the project would make money.
He lost all his money in the 1929 stock market crash.
He returned the new TV to the store and got his money back.
It has often been said that money is the root of all evil.
The money is great in my new job.

Webster's 1913 Dictionary:
n.1.A piece of metal, as gold, silver, copper, etc., coined, or stamped, and issued by the sovereign authority as a medium of exchange in financial transactions between citizens and with government; also, any number of such pieces; coin.
To prevent such abuses, . . . it has been found necessary . . . to affix a public stamp upon certain quantities of such particular metals, as were in those countries commonly made use of to purchase goods. Hence the origin of coined money, and of those public offices called mints.
2.Any written or stamped promise, certificate, or order, as a government note, a bank note, a certificate of deposit, etc., which is payable in standard coined money and is lawfully current in lieu of it; in a comprehensive sense, any currency usually and lawfully employed in buying and selling.
3.Any article used as a medium of payment in financial transactions, such as checks drawn on checking accounts.
4.(Economics) Any form of wealth which affects a person's propensity to spend, such as checking accounts or time deposits in banks, credit accounts, letters of credit, etc. Various aggregates of money in different forms are given different names, such as M-1, the total sum of all currency in circulation plus all money in demand deposit accounts (checking accounts).
4.In general, wealth; property; as, he has much money in land, or in stocks; to make, or lose, money.
The love of money is a root of all kinds of evil.
Money bill
(Legislation) a bill for raising revenue.
Money broker
a broker who deals in different kinds of money; one who buys and sells bills of exchange; - called also money changer.
Money cowrie
(Zool.) any one of several species of Cypræa (esp. Cypræa moneta) formerly much used as money by savage tribes. See Cowrie.
Money of account
a denomination of value used in keeping accounts, for which there may, or may not, be an equivalent coin; e. g., the mill is a money of account in the United States, but not a coin.
Money order
a - an order for the payment of money; specifically, a government order for the payment of money, issued at one post office as payable at another; - called also postal money order.
b - a similar order issued by a bank or other financial institution.
Money scrivener
a person who procures the loan of money to others.
Money spider
(Zool.) a small spider; - so called as being popularly supposed to indicate that the person upon whom it crawls will be fortunate in money matters.
Money's worth
a fair or full equivalent for the money which is paid.
A piece of money
a single coin.
Ready money
money held ready for payment, or actually paid, at the time of a transaction; cash.
plastic money
credit cards, usually made out of plastic; also called plastic; as, put it on the plastic.
To make money
to gain or acquire money or property; to make a profit in dealings.
v. t.1.To supply with money.

Legal Dictionary:

MONEY. Gold, silver, and some other less precious metals, in the progress of civilization and commerce, have become the common standards of value; in order to avoid the delay and inconvenience of regulating their weight and quality whenever passed, the governments of the civilized world have caused them to be manufactured in certain portions, and marked with a Stamp which attests their value; this is called money. 1 Inst. 207; 1 Hale's Hist. 188; 1 Pardess. n. 22; Dom. Lois civ. liv. prel. t. 3, s. 2, n. 6.
     2. For many purposes, bank notes; (q.v.) 1 Y. & J, 380; 3 Mass. 405; 14 Mass. 122; 2 N. H. Rep. 333; 17 Mass. 560; 7 Cowen, 662; 4 Pick. 74; Bravt. 24; a check; 4 Bing. 179; S. C. 13 E. C. L. R. 295; and negotiable notes; 3 Mass. 405; will be so considered. To support a count for money had and received, the receipt by the defendant of bank notes, promissory notes: 3 Mass. 405; 3 Shepl. 285; 9 Pick. 93; John. 132; credit in account, in the books of a third person; 3 Campb. 199; or any chattel, is sufficient; 4 Pick. 71; 17 Mass. 560; and will be treated as money. See 7 Wend. 311; 8 Wend. 641; 7 S. & R. 246; 8 T. R. 687; 3 B. & P. 559; 1 Y. & J. 380.
     3. The constitution of the United States has vested in congress the power "to coin money, and regulate the value thereof." Art. 1, s. 8.
     4. By virtue of this constitutional authority, the following provisions have been enacted by congress.
     1. Act of April 2, 1792, 1 Story's L. U. S. 229.
     1. Sec. 9. That there shall be from time to time, struck and coined at the said mint, coins of gold, silver, and copper, of the following denominations, values, and descriptions, viz: Eagles; each to be of the value of ten dollars, or units, and to contain two hundred and forty-seven grains and four-eighths of a grain of pure, or two hundred and seventy grains of standard, gold. Half eagles; each to be of the value of five dollars, and to contain one hundred and twenty-three grains and six-eighths of a pure, or one hundred and thirty-five grains of standard gold. Quarter eagles; each to be of the value of two dollars and a half dollar, and to contain sixty-one grains and seven-eighths of a grain of pure, or sixty-seven grains and four-eighths of a grain of standard gold. Dollars, or units; each to be of the value of a Spanish milled dollar, as the same is now current, and to contain three hundred and seventy-one grains and four-sixteenth parts of a grain of pure, or four hundred and sixteen grains of standard silver. Half dollars; each to be of half the value of the dollar or unit, and to contain one hundred and eighty-five grains and ten-sixteenth parts of a grain of pure, or two hundred and eight grains of standard, silver. Quarter dollars; each to be of one-fourth the value of the dollar, or unit, and to contain ninety-two grains and thirteen-sixteenth parts of a grain of pure, or one hundred and four grains of standard, silver. Dimes; each to be of the value of one-tenth of a dollar, or unit, and to contain thirty-seven grains and two sixteenth parts of a grain of pure, or forty-one grains and three-fifth parts of a grain of standard, silver. Half dimes; each to be of the value of one-twentieth of dollar, and to contain eighteen grains and nine-sixteenth parts of a grain of pure, or twenty grains and four-fifth parts of a grain of standard, silver. Cents; each to be of the value of the one-hundredth part of a dollar, and to contain eleven pennyweights of copper. Half cents; each to be of the value of half a cent, and to contain five pennyweights and, a half a pennyweight of copper.
     5.-Sec. 10. That upon the said coins, respectively, there shall be the following devises and legends, namely: Upon one side of each of the said coins there shall be an impression emblematic of liberty, with an inscription of the word liberty, and the year of the coinage; and, upon the reverse of each of the gold and silver coins, there shall be the figure or representation of an eagle, with this inscription, "United States of America:" and, upon the reverse of each of the copper coins there shall be an inscription which shall express the denomination of the piece, namely, cent or half cent, as the case may require.
     6.-Sec. 11. That the proportional value of gold to silver in all coins which shall, by law, be current as money within the United States, shall be as fifteen to one, according to quantity in weight, of pure gold or pure silver; that is to say, every fifteen pounds weight of pure silver shall be of equal value in all payments, with one pound weight of pure gold; and so in proportion, as to any greater or less quantities of the respective metals.
     7.-Sec. 12. That the standard for all gold coins of the United States, shall be eleven parts fine to one part alloy: and accordingly, that eleven parts in twelve, of the entire weight of each of the said coins, shall consist of pure gold, and the remaining one-twelfth part of alloy; and the said alloy shall be composed of silver and copper in such proportions, not exceeding one-half silver, as shall be found convenient; to be regulated by the director of the mint for the time being, With the approbation of the president of the United States, until further provision shall be made by law. And to the end that the necessary information may be had in order to the making of such further provision, it shall be the duty of the director of the mint, at the expiration of a year after commencing the operations of the said mint, to report to congress the practice thereof during the said year, touching the composition of the alloy of the said gold coins, the reasons for such practice, and the experiments and observations which shall have been made concerning the effects of different proportions of silver and copper in the said alloy.
     8.- Sec. 13. That the standard for all silver coins of the United States, shall be one thousand four hundred and eighty-five parts fine to one hundred and seventy-nine parts alloy; and, accordingly, that one thousand four hundred and eighty-five parts in one thousand six hundred and sixty-four parts, of the entire weight of each of the said coins, shall consist of pure silver, and the remaining one hundred and seventy nine parts of alloy, which alloy shall be wholly of copper.
     9.-2. Act of June 28, 1834, 4 Sharsw. cont. of Story's Laws U. S. 2376.
     Sec. 1. That the gold coins of the United States shall contain the following quantities of metal, that is to say: each eagle shall contain two hundred and thirty-two grains of pure gold, and two hundred and fifty-eight grains of standard gold; each half-eagle, one hundred and sixteen grains of pure gold, and one hundred and twenty-nine grains of standard gold; each quarter eagle shall contain fifty-eight grains of pure gold, and sixty-four and a half grains of standard gold; every such eagle shall be of the value of ten dollars; every such half eagle shall be of the value of five dollars; and every such quarter eagle shall be of the value of two dollars and fifty cents; and the said gold coins shall be receivable in all payments, when of full weight, according to their respective values; and when of less than full weight, at less values, proportioned to their respective actual weights.
    10.-Sec. 2. That all standard gold or silver deposited for coinage after the thirty-first of July next, shall be paid for in coin under the direction of the secretary of the treasury, within five days from the making of such deposit, deducting from the amount of said deposit of gold and silver, one-half of one per centum: Provided, That no deduction shall be made unless said advance be required by such depositor within forty days.
    11.-Sec. 3. That all gold coins of the United States, minted anterior to the thirty-first day of July next, shall be receivable in all payments at the rate of ninety-four and eight-tenths of a cent per pennyweight.
    12.-3. Act of January 18, 1837, 4 Sharsw. cont. of Story's Laws U. S. 2524.
     Sec. 9. That of the silver coins, the dollar shall be of the weight of four hundred and twelve and one-half grains; the half dollar of the weight of two hundred and six and one-fourth grains; the quarter dollar of the weight of one hundred and three and one-eighth grains; the dime, or tenth part of a dollar, of the weight of forty-one and a quarter grains; and the half dime, or twentieth part of a dollar, of the weight of twenty grains, and five-eighths of a grain. And that dollars, half dollars, and quarter dollars, dimes and half dimes, shall be legal tenders of payment, according to their nominal value, for any sums whatever.
    13.-Sec. 10. That of the gold coins, the weight of the eagle shall be two hundred and fifty-eight grains; that of the half eagle, one hundred and twenty-nine grains; and that of the quarter eagle, sixty-four and one-half grain;. And that for all sums whatever, the eagle shall be a legal tender of payment for ten dollars; the half eagle for five dollars and the quarter eagle for two and a half dollars.
    14.- Sec. 11. That the silver coins heretofore issued at the mint of the United States, and the gold coins issued since the thirty-first day of July, one thousand eight hundred and thirty-four, shall continue to be legal tenders of payment for their nominal values, on the same terms as if they were of the coinage provided for by this act.
    15.-Sec. 12. That of the copper coins, the weight of the cent shall be one hundred and sixty-eight grains, and the weight of the half cent eighty four grains. And the cent shall be considered of the value of one hundredth part of a dollar, and the half cent of the value of one two-hundredth part of a dollar.
    16.-Sec. 13. That upon the coins struck at the mint, there shall be the following devices and legends; upon one side of each of said coins, there shall be an impression emblematic of liberty, with an inscription of the word LIBERTY, and the year of the coinage; and upon the reverse of each of the gold and silver coins, there shall be the figure or representation of an eagle, with the inscription United States of America, and a designation of the value of the coin; but on the reverse of the dime and half dime, cent and half cent, the figure of the eagle shall be omitted.
    17.-Sec. 38. That all acts or parts of acts heretofore passed, relating to the mint and coins of the United States, which are inconsistent with the provisions of this act, be, and the same are hereby repealed.
    18.-4. Act of March 3, 1825, 3 Story's L. U. S. 2005.
    Sec. 20. That, if any person or persons shall falsely make, forge, or counterfeit, or cause or procure to be falsely made, forged, or counterfeited, or willingly aid or assist in falsely making, forging, or counterfeiting any coin, in the resemblance or similitude of the gold or silver coin, which has been, or hereafter may be, coined at the mint of the United States; or in the resemblance or similitude of any foreign gold or silver coin which by law now is, or hereafter may be made current in the United States; or shall pass, utter, publish, or sell, or attempt to pass, utter, publish, or sell, or bring into the United States, from any foreign place, with intent to pass, utter, publish, or sell, as true, any such false, forged, or counterfeited coin, knowing the same to be false, forged, or counterfeited, with intent to defraud any body politic, or corporate, or any other person or persons, whatsoever; every person, so offending, shall be deemed guilty of felony, and shall, on conviction thereof, be punished by fine, not exceeding five thousand dollars, and by imprisonment, and confinement to hard labor, not exceeding ten years, according to the, aggravation of the offence.
    19.-Sec. 21. That, if any person or persons shall falsely make, forge, or counterfeit, or cause or procure to be falsely made, forged or counterfeited, or willingly aid or assist in falsely making, forging or counterfeiting any coin, in the resemblance or similitude of any copper coin, which has been, or hereafter may be, coined at the mint of the United States; or shall pass, utter, publish, or sell, or attempt to pass, utter, publish or sell, or bring into the United States, from any foreign place, with intent to pass, utter, publish, or sell as true, any such false, forged, or counterfeited coin, with intent to defraud any body politic, or corporate, or any other person or persons whatsoever; every person so offending, shall be deemed guilty of felony, and shall, on conviction thereof, be punished by fine, not exceeding one thousand dollars, and by imprisonment, and confinement, to hard labor, not exceeding three years. See generally, 1 J. J. Marsh. 202; 1 Bibb, 330; 2 Wash. 282; 3 Call, 557; 5 S. & R. 48; 1 Dall. 124; 2 Dana, 298; 3 Conn. 534; 4 Harr. & McHen. 199.
    20.-5. Act of March 3, 1849, Minot's Statutes at Large of U. S. 397.
    21.-Sec. 1. That there shall be, from time to time, struck and coined at the mint of the United States, and the branches thereof, conformably in all respects to law, (except that on the reverse of the gold dollar the figure of the eagle shall be omitted), and conformably in all respects to the standard for gold coins now established by law, coins of gold of the following denominations and values, viz.: double eagles, each to be of the value of twenty dollars, or units, and gold dollars, each to be of the value of one dollar, or unit.
    22.-Sec. 2. That, for all sums whatever, the double eagle shall be a legal tender for twenty dollars, and the gold dollar shall be a legal tender for one dollar.
    23.-Sec. 3. That all laws now in force in relation to the coins of the United States, and the striking and coining the same, shall, so far as applicable, have full force and effect in relation to the coins herein authorized, whether, the said laws are penal or otherwise; and whether they are for preventing counterfeiting or debasement, for protecting the currency, for regulating and guarding the process of striking and coining, and the preparations therefor, or for the security of the coin, or for any other purpose.
    24.-Sec. 4. That, in adjusting the weights of gold coins henceforward, the following deviations from the standard weight shall not be exceeded in any of the single pieces; namely, in the double eagle, the eagle, and the half eagle, one half of a grain, and in the quarter eagle, and gold dollar, one quarter of a grain; and that, in weighing a large number of pieces together, when delivered from the chief coiner to the treasurer, and from the treasurer to the depositors, the deviation from the standard weight shall not exceed three pennyweights in one thousand double eagles; two pennyweights in one thousand, eagles; one and one half pennyweights in one thousand half eagle;; one pennyweight in one thousand quarter eagles; and one half of a pennyweight in one thousand gold dollars.
    25.-6. Act of March 3, 1851. Minot's Statutes at Large, U. S. 591.
    26.-Sec. 11. That from and after the passage of this act, it shall be lawful to coin at the mint of the United States and its branches, a piece of the denomination and legal value of three cents, or three hundredths of a dollar, to be composed of three-fourths silver and one-fourth copper and to weigh twelve grains and three eighths of a grain; that the said coin shall bear such devices as shall be conspicuously different from those of the other silver coins, and of the gold dollar, but having the inscription United States of America, and its denomination and date; and that it shall be a legal tender in payment of debts for all sums of thirty cents and under. And that no ingots shall be used for the coinage of the three cent pieces herein authorized, of which the quality differs more than five thousandths from the legal standard; and that in adjusting the weight of the said coin, the following deviations from the standard weight shall not be exceeded, namely, one half of a grain in the single piece, and one pennyweight in a thousand pieces.


Dream Dictionary:
To see or win money in your dream, symbolizes that success and prosperity is within your reach. Money may represent confidence, self-worth, success, or values. You have much belief in yourself. Alternatively, dreaming about money, refers to your attitudes

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